Shema by Anna Brooks (Shema Yisrael)

Shema — Anna Brooks
I won’t tell you, that he loves me, I won’t tell you that he saved my life
But I can say as loud and clear, as I can sing from my lips to your ears, that there’s
One of our God, in every one of our lives (and that’s why we sing)
Shema, Yisrael Adonai Elohaynu Adonai, Echad (oh and that’s why we sing)
Shema, Yisrael Adonai Elohaynu Adonai, Echad
I won’t tell you, that he controls my life, I won’t tell you that to have his love would be my ever-lasting plight.
But I can say as loud and clear, as I can sing from my lips to your ears, that there’s One of our God, our ner tamid, our ever-lasting light
Shema Yisrael…

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3 Responses to Shema by Anna Brooks (Shema Yisrael)

  1. Pingback: Shema – Listen! (Part 1) | Burning Fire Shut Up In My Bones

  2. Pingback: SHEMA – LISTEN! (PART 2) | Burning Fire Shut Up In My Bones

  3. Cheryl A. Showers, here’s a good read by James Tabor.
    “For untold millions of Christians asking the “Lord” for guidance, help, and even salvation is a complex and confusing business. Evangelicals often pray the “sinner’s prayer” asking Jesus directly to come into their “hearts” (Revelation 3:20; Romans 10:13). Or alternatively, they might call upon God to save them “in the name of Jesus.” I remember growing up in an evangelical Christian tradition and hearing prayers that began: Heavenly Father, we thank you for this or that…for sending your son Jesus Christ into the world…and we are grateful that you shed your precious blood for our sins…”

    The switch from talking “to” God “about” Jesus and praying “to God” as if he were Jesus, or talking “to Jesus” as if he were God was often seamless–in a single prayer. I remember being surprised my first semester teaching my historical Jesus course at Notre Dame when some of my Roman Catholic students would refer to Jesus as God without blinking an eye–as in “Dr. Tabor, what about that time God walked on the water and calmed the storm on the Sea of Galilee?” It took me and any non-Catholics in the class a second or two to realize they were referring to the gospels narratives about Jesus. But had they used the term “the Lord” there would be no problem–since the word “Lord” in English can easily mean God, Jesus Christ, or both–and is commonly so used in our culture. I remember the popular evangelical song from the 1960s–”I know the Lord will find a way for me…” It really did not matter if one was referring to God or Jesus–and dozens of Christian hymns, both formal and informal, have the same ambiguity.”
    http://jamestabor.com/2013/12/28/praying-to-jesus-how-it-all-began/

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