Parshah Vayeishev Genesis 37:1-40:23

Parshah Vayeishev Genesis 37:1-40:23

Jacob settles in Hebron with his twelve sons. His favorite is seventeen-year-old Joseph, whose brothers are jealous of the preferential treatment he receives from his father, such as a precious many-colored coat that Jacob makes for Joseph. Joseph relates to his brothers two of his dreams which foretell that he is destined to rule over them, increasing their envy and hatred towards him.

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Simeon and Levi plot to kill him, but Reuben suggests that they throw him into a pit instead, intending to come back later and save him. While Joseph is in the pit, Judah has him sold to a band of passing Ishmaelites. The brothers dip Joseph’s special coat in the blood of a goat and show it to their father, leading him to believe that his most beloved son was devoured by a wild beast.

Judah marries and has three children. The eldest, Er, dies young and childless, and his wife, Tamar, is given in levirate marriage to the second son, Onan. Onan sins by spilling his seed, and he too meets an early death. Judah is reluctant to have his third son marry her. Determined to have a child from Judah’s family, Tamar disguises herself as a prostitute and seduces Judah himself. Judah hears that his daughter-in-law has become pregnant and orders her executed for harlotry, but when Tamar produces some personal effects he left with her as a pledge for payment, he publicly admits that he is the father. Tamar gives birth to twin sons, Peretz (an ancestor of King David) and Zerach.

Joseph is taken to Egypt and sold to Potiphar, the minister in charge of Pharaoh’s slaughterhouses. G‑d blesses everything he does, and soon he is made overseer of all his master’s property. Potiphar’s wife desires the handsome and charismatic lad; when Joseph rejects her advances, she tells her husband that the Hebrew slave tried to force himself on her, and has him thrown into prison. Joseph gains the trust and admiration of his jailers, who appoint him to a position of authority in the prison administration.

In prison, Joseph meets Pharaoh’s chief butler and chief baker, both incarcerated for offending their royal master. Both have disturbing dreams, which Joseph interprets; in three days, he tells them, the butler will be released and the baker hanged. Joseph asks the butler to intercede on his behalf with Pharaoh. Joseph’s predictions are fulfilled, but the butler forgets all about Joseph and does nothing for him.

 

SOURCE: http://www.chabad.org/parshah/article_cdo/aid/3202/jewish/Vayeishev-in-a-Nutshell.htm

Parshat Vayeshev

I offer thanks to You, living and eternal King, for You have mercifully restored my soul within me; Your faithfulness is great.
I wonder what it is that the people who criticize me for telling this story truly object to: is it that I have dared to tell the story? Or that the story turns out not to be the one they wanted to hear? Any non-christian/messianic that study the book of GENESIS-MALACHI first, will surely know and understand;


1) GOD is One
2) Satan is a faithful servant
3) God created good and evil
4) Torah is not hard to obey
5) Hell is not in there
6) Jesus/Yeshua is not the Moshiach
7) Human sacrifice for sin is an abomination
8) Remission of sin is not by blood
9) God is not man
10) God can’t die
What is Moshiach?
Think Judaism is about tradition? It’s not.

Because the tradition itself is about something much bigger. About Abraham smashing the idols in his father’s house. Moses liberating a people from slavery. Isaiah lecturing a war-hungry civilization on world peace. It’s about changing the world and making it the way it’s supposed to be.

Every book of Torah is filled with that idea. Every mitzvah we do is part of creating that world. Every moment of our history, that hope beats in our hearts.

Today we discover that humanity has bought into our dream. That the pieces are neatly falling in place. That rays of a new dawn have already begun to shine.

http://www.moshiach101.com/

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