Quitting Jesus in 10 Questions

From Jason Spiritualbabies 10 questions

We asked some friends to answer 10 questions regarding their leaving of Christianity and Jesus.

These are their answers. They offer their own personal experiences in the hope they can give some support, inspiration and strength to any one else seeking to better understand the relationship between the ‘New’ Testament and the Hebrew Bible.

Audio quality may vary depending on the speakers equipment.

For more information: http://www.Spiritualbabies.net

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Did Paul faithfully transmit the original message of Jesus?

saint-paul-preaching

In order to be convinced that the gentile church is truly

transmitting the original message of Jesus, one must determine

that Paul’s teachings conformed with the teachings of Jesus.

The gentile church only learned of Jesus through the teachings

of Paul. If Paul’s teachings were not synonymous with the

teachings of Jesus, then the gentile church does not possess the

original message of Jesus.

 

To determine Paul’s connection to Jesus, we will turn to the

books of Christian scripture. It is clear that the editors of these

books were strongly motivated to present Paul as one who is

faithfully transmitting the original message of Jesus. Yet even

these biased writers, were not able to do so.

 

The Christian scriptures describe the basis of Paul’s mission

in the following manner. Paul never saw Jesus in real life.

Neither did Paul learn of Jesus’s teachings through the

disciples of Jesus. Paul emphatically states (in the 1st and 2nd

chapters of Galatians) that no living person was involved in

transmitting Jesus’s message to him. Paul only learned of the

teachings of Jesus through a series of visions. In these visions,

Jesus appeared to him and imparted his teachings. Paul’s

entire message was the product of these visions.

 

The only way we can verify the truth of Paul’s claim, is by

determining the reaction of Jesus’s disciples to Paul’s

message. These men who lived with Jesus and heard him

teach, could compare the teachings that they heard, to the

prophecy of Paul. How did the Jewish following of James

react to Paul’s claim to prophecy?

 

Paul makes the claim (Galatians 2:9) that the leaders of the

Jerusalem Church acknowledged the fact that he was

appointed (by the dead Jesus) as a messenger to the gentiles.

But Paul was lying. James and the Jerusalem Church never

acknowledged the validity of Paul’s visions. It is the Christian

scriptures themselves who contradict Paul’s claim.

 

The 15th chapter of the book of Acts, describes how the

leadership of the Jerusalem Church disregarded Paul’s claim

to prophecy. Paul had come to Jerusalem. He had been

preaching to the gentiles that they are not required to practice

the law of Moses. Some members of the Jerusalem Church

disagreed with Paul. They felt that in order for a gentile to join

their following, he should be required to observe the law of

Moses. This question was brought before the leadership of the

Jerusalem Church. The elders of the church discussed the

question, and James handed down his decision. His judgment

was that the gentiles were not obligated to observe the entirety

of the law of Moses as a prerequisite to joining the Christian

community. But he stipulated that the gentiles were obligated

to observe certain dietary laws, and to avoid immorality.

 

If Paul was telling us the truth when he claimed that the

leadership of the Jerusalem Church acknowledged him as a

true prophet, then this story makes no sense. Here we have

Paul, who was personally appointed by the dead Jesus as his

emissary to the gentile world. Whatever Paul taught was

personally revealed to him in these prophetic visions. One of

the central teachings of Paul was that the gentile world is not

bound by the law of Moses. Yet when the leaders of the

Jerusalem Church are in doubt as to what Jesus would have

said concerning the gentiles, they discuss the question, and

look to James for guidance. If there was any truth to Paul’s

claim, that these leaders acknowledged the truth of his

prophecy, then they should have simply asked him “what did

Jesus tell you?” The fact that they considered the question, and

the method that they used to resolve the question, clearly tells

us that these men did not believe that Jesus had ever spoken to

Paul. The author of the book of Acts, his bias

notwithstanding, could not hide this simple fact.

Source: Yisroel C. Blumenthal  

http://noahide-ancient-path.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/youaremywitnesses1.pdf

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His Name Will Be One – Avraham ben Yaakov

His Name Will Be One – Avraham ben Yaakov

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Hezekiah king of Judah, name means Hizkiyyahu – the mighty god.

Christians are fond of using Isaiah 9:6 as a “proof text” for the messiahship and deity of Jesus. Context is important to reading scripture, especially prophecy.

What is the book of Isaiah, of whom does the prophet speak in it’s chapters?

Isa 1:1 The vision of Isaiah the son of Amoz, which he saw concerning Judah and Jerusalem, in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah.
Isa 1:2 Hear, O heavens, and give ear, O earth, for the LORD hath spoken:

Only one person in the jewish scriptures is referred to as “mighty god” and his name is Hizkiyyahu or, Hezekiah (mighty god)

Hezekiah – Hizkiyyahu or Hizkiyyah – Among Hezekiah’s first acts was the repair of the Temple, which had been closed during the reign of Ahaz. He reorganized the services of the priests and Levites, purged the Temple and its vessels, and opened it with imposing sacrifices (2 Chronicles 29:3-36). He resolved to abolish what the Hebrew Bible refers to as idolatry from his kingdom, and among other things that he did to this end, he destroyed the high places (or bamot) and “bronze serpent” (or “Nehushtan”), recorded as being made by Moses according to the command of God (Numbers 21:8), which became an object of idolatrous worship. In place of this, he centralized the worship of God at the Jerusalem Temple. Hezekiah also resumed the Passover pilgrimage and the tradition of inviting the scattered tribes of Israel to take part in a Passover festival. He also sent messengers to Ephraim and Manasseh inviting them to Jerusalem for the celebration of the Passover. The messengers, however, were not only not listened to, but were even laughed at; only a few men of Asher, Manasseh, and Zebulun came to Jerusalem. Nevertheless the Passover was celebrated with great solemnity and such rejoicing as had not been in Jerusalem since the days of Solomon.[6]
Hezekiah is portrayed by the Hebrew Bible as a great and good king. He is one of the few kings praised so highly as to have “trusted in the Lord the God of Israel; so that there was no one like him among all the kings of Judah after him, or among those who were before him” (2 Kings 18:5).

The Talmud (Bava Batra 15a) credits Hezekiah with overseeing the compilation of the biblical books of Isaiah, Proverbs, Song of Songs and Ecclesiastes.
According to Jewish tradition, the victory over the Assyrians and Hezekiah’s return to health happened at the same time, the first night of Passover.

prism

Hezekiah’s “success” is mitigated just a verse later: “In the fourteenth year of King Hezekiah, Sennacherib king of Assyria came up against all the fortified cities of Judah and took them” (2 Kgs 18:13). Hezekiah then apologizes to the Assyrian king and agrees to pay whatever tribute is imposed, including “silver” and “gold” from “the temple of the Lord” (2 Kgs 18:14–15). In addition, both Hezekiah himself (2 Kgs 19:4) and Isaiah (2 Kgs 19:30–31) refer to “the surviving remnant of the house of Judah.” Although the storyline in 2 Kings precedes the miraculous rescue of Jerusalem in center stage (2 Kgs 18:17–19:37), 2 Kgs 18:13–16 are important verses that might go overlooked. But other passages elsewhere in the Bible, namely Micah’s lament for these destroyed cities of Judah, make sure that the readers of the Bible do not forget those outlying towns that were not as fortunate as the capital city of Jerusalem (Mic 1:1–16). Sennacherib’s Prism claims that he had taken captive “200,150 people” and had “diminished his land.” And the wall relief of the siege of Lachish in Sennacherib’s palace in Nineveh graphically illustrates the cruel terror with which the Assyrians repay their rebels, as does the archaeology of Lachish itself.

Nineveh in the News: 

Iraqis Suffer In Nineveh As World Watches Gaza

An ancient landscape that was once the envy, perhaps the centre, of the civilised world.

Now a desert hell for hundreds of thousands of Iraqis, Nineveh faces a religious pogrom while the eyes of the outside world are fixed on Gaza.

Its community is a living tie to the global past of monotheism with a theological tradition that incorporates Zoroastrianism, Judaism, and paganism.

Now some 300,000 – the core population – are reported to be under pressure from the IS to leave their villages near Mosul or face death.

They have joined tens of thousands of Christians from Nineveh’s capital and surroundings who were given the choice to convert to Islam or die.

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Israel and Jerusalem – Eternal Choices

Israel and Jerusalem – Eternal Choices

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Christians often use the example of the tabernacle as a justification for their worship of Jesus. The missionary contends that just as God came to dwell in the tabernacle, allowing His people to direct worship towards Him by bowing towards the Holy of Holies – so it is with Jesus, they claim. They argue that the infinite God came to dwell in Jesus’ finite body and therefore there is nothing wrong with the Christians directing their worship towards Jesus.

This fallacy of this argument is readily apparent. The tabernacle had no personality of its own. The tabernacle was an inanimate building within which God’s presence came to dwell. No one ever confused the tabernacle with God. No one ever claimed that the tabernacle was a second person in a triune godhead. Everyone understood that there are two separate entities here; the tabernacle and God, and no one ever confused the two or fused the two together.

Jesus, on the other hand, was a human being with a human personality. Christians acknowledge as much. No one ever claimed that the body of Jesus was an empty shell that served as a resting place for an entity that was completely unrelated to his body. When the body of Jesus was crucified, Christians acknowledge that he suffered – not in the sense of the suffering that a person experiences when his house is destroyed, but in the sense of the pain that a person experiences when his own body is hurt. A popular Christian credo asserts that Jesus was both fully human and fully divine. No one ever dreamed of making the claim that the tabernacle was both fully physical structure and fully divine.

The comparison that Christians make between the tabernacle and Jesus doesn’t work. It is no more than a poor excuse for the justification of idolatry.

But what was the tabernacle? What do we mean when we say that God came to dwell in the tabernacle built by Moses or in Solomon’ Temple?

Perhaps we can understand the concept of God dwelling in the tabernacle when we understand the concept of God dwelling amongst the people of Israel. We find that the people of Israel are also called God’s sanctuary (Leviticus 20:3). The Scriptures describe God’s relationship to Israel with the same terms that the Scriptures describe God’s relationship with the Temple: “My name is called upon nation/house/city” (1Kings 8:23, Daniel 9:18,19, 2Chronicles 7:14). The association between God and the Temple is similar to the association between God and the people of Israel. Both of these are eternal choices that God made as to how He identifies Himself to mankind.

The term that the Scriptures use to describe God’s relationship with Israel and with the Temple (- “His name is called upon them”) is also used to describe the relationship between a husband and wife in the context of marriage (Isaiah 4:1). Marriage is more than just a relationship between a man and a woman. A man and a woman could share a secret relationship, but we would never call that relationship by the term: “Marriage”. It is only when the two parties agree to tie their identities together for all to know that we can then say that they are married.

The same applies to God’s choice of Israel and the Temple. When God chose Israel, He did not just enter into a relationship with them. He tied Himself to them in such a way that henceforth He identifies Himself towards all of mankind as the God of Israel and Israel identifies herself as the people of God. This was not something that was done secretly between God and Israel. God made His choice of Israel public to all who were able to see at the time – i.e. the Egyptians. The entire nation of Egypt saw the Nile turn into blood for seven days. They all saw the unparalleled plagues which culminated with the splitting of the sea. Since then, God has allowed no other nation to lay claim to anything that can even remotely compare to the Exodus and the revelation at Sinai (Deuteronomy 4:33,34). God points to the uniqueness of this claim as a sign that God’s covenant – His marriage, with the people of Israel still stands – to the end of time.

Indeed, since them, when people think of the Creator of all existence, they associate Him with the people of Israel. And when people see Jewish people worshiping their God, everyone knows who it si that is being worshiped – the One Creator of all.

The same applies to the Temple in Jerusalem. God didn’t just simply choose a place for His people to worship. He made this choice public knowledge. He tied His identity to this place. He calls the Temple: “My House”. From the time that God chose the Temple in Jerusalem, He calls Himself; “The one who dwells in Zion” (Joel 4:17) and the Temple is called the house of God (Psalm 122:9).

The association between God and the Temple in Jerusalem is an eternal association that still stands (Psalm 78:69, 132:14). When Jews pray towards the site of the temple everyone knows who they are praying to and when the Temple in Jerusalem is mentioned (such as when people speak of the Channuka miracle) everyone knows that this was the dwelling place of the Creator of heaven and earth.

The way that God made the choice of His house public knowledge is through His people; Israel. Once it is already established that this nation is His bride, then when they unanimously acknowledge that this place was graced by the presence of their God – the world knows that the Creator of heaven and earth came to dwell here.

Now that the Temple is destroyed and Israel is in exile, God’s honor is diminished in the eyes of the world. People understand that it is God’s house that is in ruins and that it is His people that are scattered in foreign lands. The Messianic vision of the prophets foresaw a time when God returns to dwell in His house and sanctifies His people – openly – to the eyes of all mankind (Ezekiel 37:28). Because then, and only then, will all mankind truly recognize that there is no power aside from the One Creator of heaven and earth (Isaiah 40:5, Psalm 102:16).

Source: http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2012/01/01/israel-and-jerusalem-eternal-choices/

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Distinctions between the TaNaCH and Christianity.

 

 

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Part of the document was chopped off. Here’s the rest: 
19. In the Tenach humans are known as righteous by righteous behavior. In the New Testament they are considered righteous by trusting in another’s righteousness.
20.In the Tenach God’s Law is not difficult. In the New Testament God’s Law is impossible to keep.
21.In the Tenach, God’s Law leads to life. In the New Testament God’s Law leads to death.
22.In the Tenach man is a soul. In the New Testament man is body, soul and spirit.
23.In the Tenach, upon dying, man is gathered to his fathers and sleeps in the dust of the earth until resurrection and judgment. In the New Testament upon dying, man goes immediately to judgment.
24.All of these differences are made possible by one final distinction between the Tenach and Christianity. 
In the Tenach God is the LORD who changes not. 
In Christianity God has changed.
 
A site is for Jews and non-Jews who want to learn more about Jewish beliefs, or have questions about how Hebrew Scripture has informed and shaped Jewish belief and practice throughout the ages. http://whatjewsbelieve.org/
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Christian tries to convert Tovia Singer on Air

Christian tries to convert Tovia Singer on Air

Listen as a christian tries to convert Rabbi Tovia Singer live on air. I feel for the lady, like SO many christians she knows what she believes but doesn’t know why other than what she was told. Of course, what she was told is NOT what the bible says.

Listen to more Tovia Singer on http://www.israelnationalnews.com/

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BILL WHITTLE: THE CASE FOR ISRAEL. Powerful!

In this video, Bill Whittle makes powerful arguments. You may or may not agree with him but he is basing his case on history and reason. There are many emotional arguments to counter Bill Whittle’s case, but they don’t stand up to reason. The unalienable right to self-defense is definitely an individual right. The only unalienable right possessed by a nation state of willing formation, may be the right of self-defense. Ask yourself this, how many rockets fired from land adjacent to yours would you allow to fall on your house, your town or your country before you attacked the source of the rockets? What if you actually gave the adjacent land to your enemies as a gesture of peace and your enemies used that land to stage attacks against you? If Hamas totally disarmed and stopped fighting, there would be peace. If Israel totally disarmed and stopped fighting, there would be genocide.

Watch the powerful video below.

 

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RESPONDING TO THE MISSIONARY PROOF-TEXTS by Rabbi Blumenthal

“Rabbi Blumenthal benefits the public with a new blog! Be sure to check it out!”

RESPONDING TO THE MISSIONARY PROOF-TEXTS

“Of Whom Speaketh the Prophet?”

Imagine that it is your responsibility to hire a person to fill a critical position in a department that is essential for the welfare of your nation. A particular candidate sends in his resume together with 353 papers presented as testimonials and references to his ability to fill this important post. You research each and every one of these documents. You discover that most of the telephone numbers and addresses found in the documents are bogus. The positions that this candidate claimed to have held in the past were never held by him. Some of the testimonials are about other people. Some of the documents that he presented are not even relevant to the discussion.

Would you hire this applicant?

You don’t hire him.

His friends spread rumors about you that the reason you didn’t hire their hero is because you are evil. Other friends of this applicant claim that you are blinded by a bias against their champion.

What can you do?

You can present the “353 references” to the public.

Christians believe that Jesus is the Messiah prophesied by the prophets of the Jewish Scriptures. They point to various passages in the Jewish Scripture which they understand as references to Jesus. They believe this to be so self-evident that they cannot fathom how it is that Jews who take their Scriptures seriously do not accept Jesus as their Messiah.

Some of these Christians are convinced that the Jews also see Jesus in the pages of Scripture but their evil nature has them denying him anyway. If this is your belief then the following article is not for you. Other Christians believe that the Jews are stricken with a spiritual blindness and are simply incapable of seeing the “obvious and plain truth”. If you subscribe to this belief, then this article isn’t addressing you either.

If, however; you recognize the possibility that the Jews honestly see the Bible in a different light and you are sincerely interested in hearing the Jewish point of view then I hope that my humble words will satisfy your quest.

My objective is to help you read the Scriptures from a Jewish perspective. However; before I get down to those passages that Christians see as a reference to Jesus, I will first make a statement about the original question. The question: “Of whom speaketh the prophet”; is already loaded with Christian implications. The question assumes that the prophet is speaking of some hidden character that lurks between the lines and it is the reader’s responsibility to “discover” this secret character.

The Jew doesn’t see the scriptures as some secret code that needs to be unlocked or as a mystery novel that needs to be solved. The question that the Jew asks himself as he reads the Scriptures is: “what is the prophet trying to tell me?” The interpretation of Scripture that you will find here will be based on the straightforward contextual reading of the passages.

There are several versions of the missionary “list” of prophecies “fulfilled” by Jesus. I will be addressing the prophecies listed on a piece of missionary literature that was mailed to members of the Orthodox Jewish community in Lakewood New Jersey. This list presents 353 prophecies allegedly “fulfilled” by Jesus.

Let us begin

(The numbering of the verses and the quotation following the chapter and verse are all taken from the missionary tract.)

  1. Genesis 3:15 “seed of a woman” (virgin birth)

The Christian sees deep significance in the words: “her seed” referring to Eve. The argument of the missionary is that since we only have reference to the “seed of the woman” and no mention is made of the seed of a man so we have a prophetic announcement of a “virgin birth”.

This argument fails for several reasons. According to this line of reasoning; every time that the Scriptures address an individual concerning their progeny using the term: “your seed” we ought to conclude that we are talking of a virgin birth (in those situations where a female is being addressed such as Genesis 16:10) or of a birth that is achieved through a male without a female (where a male is being addressed such as in Genesis 3:15). If this were true then we would have many virgin births announced in the Bible.

Furthermore; how could anyone know if this prophecy was ever fulfilled?

  1. Genesis 3:15 “he will bruise Satan’s head”

The simple reading of the text tells us that the snake will bite the heel of Eve’s progeny while Eve’s progeny will smite snakes on the head. This is simple and straightforward. Just as the previous verse (Genesis 3:14) speaks of snakes crawling on their bellies with no reference to a specific future event so it is with this passage. It simply describes the state of enmity between snakes and humans that will endure until the Messianic era (Isaiah 11:8; 65:25).

3. Genesis 5:24 “the bodily ascension to heaven illustrated”

This passage is not a prophetic prediction. It is a simple narrative. This narrative says nothing about a “bodily ascension” (although it doesn’t exclude it). If we insist that this narrative refers to a bodily ascension then this only harms the missionary position. We would then see that bodily ascensions are not limited to divine beings but are possible with mere humans (see also 2Kings 2:11).

4. Genesis 9:26,27 “the god of Shem will be the son of Shem”

The passage tells us that God will dwell in the tents of Shem. This was fulfilled in the Tabernacle (Exodus 29:45), in the Temple (1Kings 6:13), and will be fulfilled again in the final Temple (Ezekiel 37:28). No mention is made of a “human god”.

5. Genesis 12:3 “the seed of Abraham will bless all nations”

The verse here speaks of nations receiving blessing through Abraham. Indeed; Abraham taught the world to put their faith in the One Creator of heaven and earth. This blessing will continue through the nation of Israel as the prophets predicted (Isaiah 60:3; Zechariah 8:23).

6. Genesis 12:7 “The promise made to Abraham’s seed”

The promise that this verse describes is that the land of Israel will be given to Abraham’s children. (According to the logic of “prophecy #1” this would need to be fulfilled by one who is born of a father without a mother.) This prophecy will be fulfilled through the nation of Israel as God promised (Deuteronomy 30:5; Ezekiel 37:25).

7. Genesis 14:18 “a priest after the order of Melchizedek”

No prophetic prediction here, just a narrative.

8. Genesis 14:18 “King of Peace and Righteousness”

No prophetic prediction.

9. Genesis 14:18 “The last supper foreshadowed”

No prophetic prediction.

10. Genesis 17:19 “The seed of Isaac”

The passage speaks here of God’s eternal covenant with the people of Israel as described by the prophets (Ezekiel 15:60).

11. Genesis 22:8 “the lamb of God promised”

Not a prophetic prediction. In any case, the lamb promised here was to be a burnt offering. Jesus was never burned.

12. Genesis 22:18  “Isaac’s seed will bless all nations”

In the previous verse we learn how Abraham’s seed will be as numerous as the sand of the sea. This passage is obviously not referring to one individual but to a nation (see #5).

13. Genesis 26:2-5 “The seed of Isaac promised as the redeemer”

Here too the promise is to a nation as numerous as the stars in the sky, not to one lone individual. The promise says nothing about a redeemer, rather it speaks of inheriting the land of Israel (see #6).

14. Genesis 28:12 “The bridge to heaven”

Not a prophetic prediction. If anything the point of the vision was that God will preserve Jacob and that the place was consecrated as the House of the Lord (Malachi 3:6; Isaiah 2:2).

15. Genesis 28:14 “the seed of Jacob”

Here too the prophecy applies to a seed that is as numerous as the dust of the earth; not to a lone individual (see#5 and #6).

16. Genesis 49:10 “the time of his coming”

Here Jacob prophecies that dominion and leadership shall not depart from the tribe of Judah. Indeed; since David took the throne the leadership of the Jewish people has been in the hands of the tribe of Judah. In fact the name “Jew” is simply an English corruption of the term: “Judean” – emphasizing the abiding centrality of the tribe of Judah in the government of Israel. Until today we have accepted no other king but our loyalty is to the dynasty of David.

This prophecy does not tell us anything about the time of the Messiah’s coming.

17. Genesis 49:10 “the seed of Judah”

Tribal lineage follows the father. According to the Christian Scriptures Jesus was NOT from the seed of Judah.

18. Genesis 49:10 “called Shiloh or the one sent”

This is indeed a reference to the Messiah but there is nothing in the verse that would have us believe it is talking of Jesus. In any case; the word “Shiloh” does not mean “the one sent”.

19. Genesis 49:10 “Messiah to come before Judah lost identity”

Judah still did not lose identity (see #16).

20. Genesis 49:10 “unto him shall the obedience of the people be”

Indeed; Messiah will rule over many nations (Numbers 24;17,18; Obadiah 1:21). This is talking of dominion in the practical realm of government. In the real world; Jesus ruled over no one.

21. Exodus 3:13-15 “the great “I AM”

Here God refers to Himself as “I am”. Just because Jesus also spoke these words according to the report of the Christian Scriptures doesn’t make him god and doesn’t entitle him to claim a fulfillment of prophecy any more than the king of Tyre’s claim to divinity makes him god and a fulfillment of prophecy (Ezekiel 28:2).

22. Exodus 12:5  “a lamb without a blemish”

This is not a prophetic prediction. It is simply a description of the lamb that was brought as the Passover offering.

23. Exodus 12:13 “the blood of the lamb saves from wrath”

Those who slaughtered the lamb in obedience to God’s command were saved. The Egyptians who venerated the lamb (Exodus 8:22) were destroyed. This passage is a complete refutation to Christian theology.

24. Exodus 12:21-27 “christ is our Passover”

Did the Jewish people “venerate” the lamb? Of course not! They slaughtered the lamb in recognition that God is the absolute sovereign over every facet of existence including the lamb. The Christian veneration of Jesus is the very antithesis of everything that Passover stands for.

25. Exodus 12:46 “not a bone in the lamb to be broken”

Not a prophetic prediction.

26. Exodus 15:2 “His exaltation predicted as Yeshua”

Not a prophetic prediction rather this song praises God for having saved the Jews from the Egyptians.

27. Exodus 15:11 “His character holiness”

God’s character is indeed holiness. How was this fulfilled in a man who was full of vindictive hatred against those who saw through his charade?

28. Exodus 17:6 “the spiritual rock of Israel”

Not a prophetic prediction.

29. Exodus 33:19 “His character merciful”

Not a prophetic prediction.

30. Leviticus 1:2-9 “His sacrifice a sweet smelling savor to God”

Not a prophetic prediction.

31. Leviticus 14:11 “the leper cleansed a sign to priesthood”

Not a prophetic prediction. The cleansing of a leper is not a sign of priesthood; it is part of the office of priesthood.

32. Leviticus 16:15-17 “prefigures christ’s once-for-all death”

Not a prophetic prediction.

33. Leviticus 16:27 “suffering outside the camp”

Not a prophetic prediction.

34. Leviticus 17:11 “the blood – the life of the flesh”

Not a prophetic prediction.

35. Leviticus 17:11 “it is the blood that makes atonement”

This verse is explicitly speaking about blood on the Temple altar. Jesus’s blood was never placed on the altar. Furthermore; this passage does not say that blood is the exclusive path to atonement as Christian theologians claim (Ezekiel 33:16).

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2011/05/23/response-to-the-line-of-fire-5/

36. Leviticus 23:36-37 “The drink offering: “if any man thirst”

Not a prophetic prediction.

37. Numbers 9:12 “Not a bone of him broken”

See #25

38. Numbers 21:9 “The serpent on a pole – christ lifted up”

Interesting how in #1 the serpent is Satan. In any case this is also not a prophetic prediction.

39. Numbers 24:17 “I shall see him but not now”

This is talking of the real Messiah who will destroy Israel’s enemies not someone who gave Israel’s enemies a theological justification to persecute them.

40. Deuteronomy 18:15 “This is of a truth that prophet”

Those who applied the Law of Moses to determine that Isaiah, Ezekiel, Jeremiah and Habakkuk were authentic prophets were the same people who determined that Jesus was not. If you reject their decision as it applies to the latter, then please be consistent and reject their decision concerning the former as well.

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2011/05/17/non-prophet/

41. Deuteronomy 18:15-16 “had you believed Moses, ye would have believed me”

On what basis?

42. Deuteronomy 18:18 “sent by the Father to speak His word”

See #40

43. Deuteronomy 18:19 “whoever will not hear him must bear his sin”

See #40

44. Deuteronomy 21:23 “cursed is he that hangs on a tree”

Not a prophetic prediction. In any case the translation is incorrect. The point of the passage is that by leaving a human body hanging on a tree one disparages the honor of God.

45. Joshua 5:14-15 “the captain of our salvation”

This is not a prophetic prediction. It is referring to an angel who has come to put Israel’s physical enemies to flight; not to one who encourages Israel’s enemies in their persecution of God’s chosen people.

46. Ruth 4:4-10 “christ, our kinsman has redeemed us”

Not a prophetic prediction and no mention is made of christ.

47. 1Samuel 2:10 “shall be anointed king to the Lord”

This is talking of the real Messiah. There is no way that one can claim that Jesus fulfilled this prophecy.

48. 2Samuel 7:12 “David’s seed”

Royal lineage proceeds from the father. According to the Christian Scriptures Jesus was not from the line of David.

49. 2Samuel 7:13 “his kingdom is everlasting”

Indeed; David’s kingdom is everlasting. One who has no claim to the throne of David cannot claim to have fulfilled this prophecy.

50. 2Samuel 7:14a “the son of God”

The end of the same verse speaks of the sins of this son of God. Either Christians must admit that Jesus sinned or they cannot apply this verse to Jesus.

51. 2samuel 7:16 “David’s house established forever”

See #48

52. 2Kings 2:11 “Bodily ascension illustrated”

See#3

53. 1Cronicles 17:11 “David’s seed”

See#48

54. 1Chronicles 17:12-13 “to reign of David’s throne forever”

See #48

55. 1Chronicles 17:13 “I will be his father, he … My son”

See #48 and #50

56. Job 9:32-33 “mediator between man and God”

This is not a prophetic prediction. Job sees himself in a dispute with God and he declares that he would wish that there be an arbitrator that could judge between them.

57. Job 19:23-27 “The resurrection predicted”

The passage does not speak of a resurrection. Job presents the argument that his contention against his friends will be vindicated in the end because he believes he is right.

58. Psalm 2:1-3 “the enmity of kings foreordained”

The Psalm describes how enemy kings gather against God and His anointed one. This anointed one is described as the one who rules over Zion; God’s holy mountain. The enemies are ultimately crushed. This prophets spoke of this end time battle in which God’s enemies are physically crushed (Isaiah 60:12; Ezekiel 38:1 – 39:29; Zechariah 14:12).

How did Jesus fulfill this prophecy? Which kings heard of him in his lifetime? How did his enemies get crushed? How did he rule with a rod of iron?

This Psalm cannot be applied to Jesus.

59. Psalm 2:2 “to own the title, anointed”

This passage simply speaks of God’s anointed. There is nothing here to indicate that this anointed one is Jesus.

60. Psalm 2:6 “his character – holiness”

See #27

61. The missionary pamphlet skips #61. See #151 and #158

62. Psalm 2:6 “to own the title King”

The Psalm indeed speaks of a king but there is nothing here to indicate that this king is Jesus.

63. Psalm 2:7 “declared the beloved son”

The Davidic king is called God’s son as are the Jewish people as a whole (Exodus 4:22; Jeremiah 31:8). There is nothing in the passage that would indicate that it is talking of Jesus. See #50

64. Psalm 2:7,8 “the crucifixion and resurrection intimated”

The passage says nothing about a crucifixion or a resurrection.

65. Psalm 2:8,9 “rule the nations with a rod of iron”

This describes practical political government not religious worship.

66. Psalm 2:12 “life comes through faith in him”

According to most translations this passage speaks of embracing purity and not of any individual. Even if we were to grant the unlikely translation of “the son” favored by modern missionaries the thrust of the passage will be that the kings are encouraged to submit to the political sovereignty of the Messiah, not to worship him as a god.

67. Psalm 8:2 “the mouths of babes perfect his praise”

This is speaking about the praise of God who created the moon and the stars (verse 4) and not the praise of a man who claimed to be god.

68. Palm 8:5,6 “his humiliation and exaltation”

This passage speaks of the humility of mankind in general and of God’s kindness in granting man dominion over nature (Genesis 1:28). This has nothing to do with Jesus.

69. Psalm 9:7-10 “Judge the world in righteousness”

This is talking of God’s judgment of the world. How did Jesus “judge the world in righteousness”? JUDGENOT

70. Psalm 16:10 “was not to see corruption”

Here David speaks of himself thanking God for saving him from death; a recurring theme throughout the Psalms (33:19; 56:14; 116:8).

71. Psalm 16:9-11 “was to arise from the dead”

The Psalm says nothing of the sort.

72. Psalm 17:15 “the resurrection predicted”

The Psalm says nothing of the sort.

73. Psalm 18:2-3 “the horn of salvation”

The Psalm speaks of the God who saved David from his troubles; it has nothing to do with Jesus.

74. Psalm 22:1 “forsaken because of the sins of others”

The Psalm says nothing about why the Psalmist was forsaken.

75. Psalm 22:1 “My God my God why hast thou forsaken me”

Not a prophetic prediction.

76. Psalm 22:2  “darkness upon Calvary for three hours”

Not a prophetic prediction; no mention of Calvary and no mention of three hours.

77. Psalm 22:7 “they shoot out the lip and shake the head”

Not a prophetic prediction.

78. Psalm 22:8 “he trusted in God, let him deliver him”

Not a prophetic prediction.

79. Psalm 22:9-10 “born the saviour”

Not a prophetic prediction and not a word about a savior.

80. Psalm 22:12-13 “they seek his death”

Not a prophetic prediction.

81. Psalm 22:14 “his blood poured out when they pierced his side”

Not a prophetic prediction. The metaphor: “spilled out” is not a reference to blood just as the metaphor: “my heart is melted like wax” is not a reference to any literal melting.

82. Psalm 22:14,15 “suffered agony on Calvary”

Not a prophetic prediction and no mention made of Calvary.

83. Psalm 22:15 “he thirsted”

No comment.

84. Psalm 22:16 “they pierced his hands and his feet”

Not a prophetic prediction and there is no mention of piercing in this passage.

85. Psalm 22:17,18 “stripped him before the stares of men”

Not a prophetic prediction and no mention of anyone being stripped.

86. Psalm 22:18 “they parted his garments”

Not a prophetic prediction.

87. Psalm 22:20,21 “he committed himself to God”

Not a prophetic prediction.

88. Psalm 22:20,21 “satanic power bruising redeemer’s heel”

Not a prophetic prediction, no mention made of Satan, of redeemer or of bruising the heel.

89. Psalm 22:22 “his resurrection declared”

Not a prophetic prediction and no mention made of a resurrection.

90. Psalm 22:27-28 “he shall be the governor of nations”

This is speaking of God’s dominion over nations.

91. Psalm 22:31 “it is finished”

The verse says nothing about “finishing”.

Psalm 22 describes David’s travails. As king of Israel we can understand that David’s travails mirror those of the nation that he represents. A key verse in recognizing who it is that the prophet speaketh of in this Psalm is verse 5 where the Psalmist exclaims to God: “in You; did our fathers trust”. The Psalmist saw himself as part of a nation. He did not see his situation as unique to himself. He was asking for the same type of salvation that our ancestors merited in their trust of God. This cannot apply to Jesus’ death on the cross. Christianity sees Jesus’ suffering as something unique and unparalleled in the history of mankind and the salvation that Jesus is asking for has no comparison in the history of Israel.

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/psalm-22/

92. Psalm 23:1 “I am the good shepherd”

The Psalm is referring to God who is the good shepherd. Good human shepherds such as David direct people’s devotion towards God. Teachers who direct devotion to themselves are not “good shepherds” even by human standards.

93. Psalm 24:3 “his exaltation predicted”

Not a prophetic prediction. This Psalm speaks of all righteous people who merit to be brought close to God (see Psalm 65:5).

94. Psalm 30:3 “his resurrection predicted”

Not a prophetic prediction. The metaphor: “brought me up from the grave” is used to denote saving from deadly danger (see Psalm 86:13).

95. Psalm 31:5 “into thy hands I commit my spirit”

Not a prophetic prediction. This applies to anyone who trusts in God.

96. Psalm 31:11 “his acquaintances fled from him”

This Psalm speaks of the sins of the Psalmist (verse 12). Christians who believe that Jesus was sinless cannot claim that Jesus fulfilled this “prophecy”.

97. Psalm 31:13 “they took counsel to put him to death”

Not a prophetic prediction and not applicable to the Christian Jesus (see #96).

98. Psalm 31:14,15 “he trusted in God, let Him deliver him”

Not a prophetic prediction and not applicable to the Christian Jesus (see #96). This Psalm refers to David himself as well as to anyone who trusts in God provided that they are not deluded into thinking that they are sinless.

99. Psalm 34:20 “not a bone in him broken”

Not a prophetic prediction. This Psalm is talking of all righteous people.

100. Psalm 35:11 “false witnesses rose up against him”

Not a prophetic prediction. This Psalm refers to David himself.

101. Psalm 35:19 “he was hated without a cause”

Not a prophetic prediction. David is speaking of himself (see 1Samuel 26:18).

102. Psalm 38:11 “his friends stood afar off”

This Psalm refers to David himself. Furthermore; the Psalmist makes reference to his own sins (verses 5,6,7,19). This Psalm cannot be referring to someone who claimed to have never sinned.

103. Psalm 38:12 “enemies try to entangle him by craft”

See #102

104. Psalm 38:12-13 “silent before his accusers”

See #102

105. Psalm 38:20 “he went about doing good”

See #102

106. Psalm 40:2-5 “the joy of his resurrection predicted”

This Psalm is speaking again about David himself and in a broader sense about anyone who trusts in God and admits their own sins (verse 13). This Psalm cannot be referring to one who refused to acknowledge that he ever sinned.

107. Psalm 40:8 “his delight – the will of the Father”

See #106

108. Psalm 40:9 “he was to preach righteousness in Israel”

See #106

109. Psalm 40:14 “confronted by adversaries in the garden”

See #106. No mention made of a garden.

110. Psalm 41:9 “betrayed by a familiar friend”

This Psalm mentions the sins of the Psalmist (verse 5) obviously excluding Jesus who never admitted a sin.

111. Psalm 45:2 “words of grace come from his lips”

This Psalm is referring to a king (David) who got married and had children (verses 10-16); not to one who never married.

112. Psalm 45:6 “to own the title, God or Eloh-m”

See #111. The Moses owned the title “Eloh-m” (Exodus 7:1) without making him divine.

113. Psalm 45:7 “the special anointing by the holy spirit”

See #111. No mention is made of anointing by the holy spirit. God anointed David through His prophet (1samuel 16:13).

114. Psalm 45:7,8 “called the christ (Messiah or anointed)”

See #111. All Davidic kings are called “anointed”.

115. Psalm 45:17 “his name remembered forever”

See #111. David’s name is remembered forever (2Samuel 7:16; Psalm 41:13).

116. Psalm 55:12-14 “betrayed by a friend, not an enemy”

Not a prophetic prediction.

117. Psalm 55:15 “unrepentant death of betrayer”

The verse is speaking of a plurality of enemies; not one single person. The Psalm is speaking of David himself.

118. Psalm 68:18 “to give gifts to men”

The Psalmist is speaking of a past event and he is speaking of taking gifts not giving gifts.

119. Psalm 68:18 “ascended into heaven”

The Psalmist is speaking of an event that had already happened by the time he recorded the Psalm. This is referring to the encounter that took place between God and Israel at Sinai (as per the previous verse). This refers to God Himself (a similar metaphor is found in Psalm 7:8). The gifts that were taken refer to Israel’s willingness to accept God’s Law (Exodus 24:7).

120. Psalm 69:4 “hated without cause”

This Psalm speaks of the Psalmist’s sins (verse 6). Christians who like to believe that Jesus was sinless cannot turn around and claim that he fulfilled this prophecy. The Psalm speaks of David himself. See #101.

121. Psalm 69:8 “a stranger to his own brethren”

See #120.

122. 69:9 “zealous for the Lord’s house”

See #120

123. Psalm 69:14-20 “Messiah’s anguish of soul before crucifixion”

See #120. No mention is made of a crucifixion.

124. Psalm 69:20 “my soul is exceedingly sorrowful”

See #120

125. Psalm 69:21 “given vinegar in thirst”

See #120

126. Psalm 69:26 “the savior given and smitten by God”

See #120. No mention made of a savior.

127. Psalm 72:10,11 “great persons were to visit him”

This is talking of Solomon (1Kings 10:24,25; 2Chronicles 9:23,24).

128. Psalm 72:16 “the corn of wheat to fall into the ground”

Not a prophetic prediction. Rather this is a description of the blessing of abundance that will abide in the day of the righteous and just king.

129. Psalm 72:17 “belief on his name will produce offspring”

No mention made about belief in anyone’s name.

130. Psalm 72:17 “all nations shall be blessed by him”

This was indeed fulfilled by Solomon (1Kings 10:8; 2Chronicles 9:8).

131. 72:17 “all nations shall call him blessed”

See #130

132. Psalm 78:1-2 “he would teach in parables”

Not a prophetic prediction. This could apply to anyone who teaches a parable.

133. Psalm 78:2b “to speak the wisdom of God with authority”

Not a prophetic prediction and no mention made of “authority”.

134. Psalm 80:17 “the man of God’s right hand”

This applies to Israel as is obvious from the beginning of the passage where Israel is the vine planted by God’s right hand.

135. Psalm 88 “the suffering and reproach of Calvary”

This Psalm describes Israel’s suffering in exile.

136. Psalm 88:8 “they stood afar and watched”

The Psalmists speaks of the fact that those who knew him were distant from him; no mention is made of them “watching” his suffering.

137. Psalm 89:27 “firstborn”

This speaks of David himself as is obvious from the context.

138. Psalm 89:27 “Emanuel to be higher than earthly kings”

No mention is made of “Emanuel” and the promise of exaltation over other kings is simply a reiteration of the promise to Israel (Deuteronomy 26:19).

139. Psalm 89:35-37 “David’s seed, throne, kingdom endure forever”

This is God’s promise to David (2Samuel 7:16).

140. Psalm 89:36-37 “his character – faithfulness”

This is speaking about God Himself.

141. Psalm 90:2 “he is from everlasting”

This is speaking about God.

142. Psalm 91:11,12 “identified as Messianic; used to tempt christ”

No mention is made of Messiah. The passage is a promise to those who take shelter under God’s wing.

143. Psalm 97:9 “his exaltation predicted”

The passage speaks of God’s exaltation.

144. Psalm 100:5 “his character – goodness”

This is talking of God’s character.

145. Psalm 102:1-11 “the suffering and reproach of Calvary”

Tis is talking of Israel’s suffering in exile as the context makes clear (verse 14)

146. Psalm 102:25-27 “Messiah is the preexistent son”

No mention is made of any preexistent son.

147. Psalm 109:25 “ridiculed”

David is talking of his own suffering. This is not a prophetic prediction.

148. Psalm 110:1 “son of David”

See #48

149. Psalm 110:1 “to ascend to the right hand of the Father”

No mention is made of an “ascension”. Israel herself is supported by God’s right hand while He destroys their enemies (Isaiah 41:10).

150. Psalm 110:1 “David’s son called Lord”

The word for “lord” used in this passage denotes an earthly lord (as in 1samuel 24:8) rather than the divine Lord.

151. The missionary tract skips #151 – see #61 and #158

152. Psalm 110:4 “a priest after Melchizedek’s order”

David and his seed are priests in the sense that Melchizedek was a priest; teaching and administering justice in the city of Jerusalem.

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/psalm-110/

153. Psalm 112:4 “his character – compassionate, gracious, et al”

Not a prophetic prediction. The passage describes the righteousness of all who truly fear God.

154. Psalm 118:17,18 “Messiah’s resurrection assured”

No mention is made of Messiah or a resurrection.

155. Psalm 118:22,23 “the rejected stone is head of the corner”

Not a prophetic prediction. This Psalm refers to David himself as well as to the people of Israel.

156. Psalm 118:26a “the blessed one presented to Israel”

Not a prophetic prediction. Rather this verse is the greeting that would be used to greet the pilgrims when they arrived at the Temple.

157. Psalm 118:26b “to come while the Temple is still standing”

Not a prophetic prediction. Furthermore this verse addresses a plural group not a single individual.

158. The missionary tract skips # 158 – see #61 and #151

159. Psalm 132:11 “the seed of David 9the fruit of his body)”

See # 48

160. Psalm 129:3 “he was scourged”

This Psalm explicitly speaks of Israel.

161. Psalm 138:1-6 “the supremacy of David’s seed amazes kings”

The Psalm is speaking of the kings praising God; not the scion of David’s seed.

162. Psalm 147:3,6 “the earthly ministry of christ described”

This Psalm speaks of God’s kindness.

163. Proverbs 1:23 “he will send the spirit of God”

Not a prophetic prediction. This verse is establishing the authority for the Book of Proverbs itself.

164. Proverbs 8:23 “foreordained from everlasting”

Not a prophetic prediction. This passage speaks of God’s wisdom as is evident from verse 1 of this chapter.

165. Song of Solomon 5:16 “the altogether lovely one”

This is talking of God.

166. Isaiah 2:3 “He shall teach the nations”

This is talking about God teaching the nations during a time of universal peace.

167. Isaiah 2:4 “He shall judge among the nations”

See #166

168. Isaiah 6:1 “when Isaiah saw His glory”

Isaiah saw the glory of God.

169. Isaiah 6:8 “the one sent by God”

This is Isaiah himself as is obvious from the context.

170. Isaiah 6:9-10 “parables fall on deaf ears”

This is a prophecy about Isaiah’s own ministry.

171. Isaiah 6:9-12 “blinded to christ and deaf to his words”

See #170

172. Isaiah 7:14 “to be born of a virgin”

No mention made of a virgin and the prophecy was to be fulfilled in the times of King Ahaz who died many centuries before Jesus was born.

173. Isaiah 7:14 “to be Emmanuel – God with us”

This was an encouragement to King Ahaz that he and his people will survive the onslaught of the Arameans and subsequently the Assyrians. The child was named Emmanuel as a sign of God’s favor to the Judean kingdom.

174. Isaiah 8:8 “called Emmanuel”

See # 173

175. Isaiah 8:14 “a stone of stumbling, a rock of offense”

This prophecy was fulfilled in Hezekiah’s time during the Assyrian invasion as is evident from the context.

176. Isaiah 9:1,2 “his ministry to begin in Galilee”

This refers to the invasion of the Assyrian king which began in Galilee.

177. Isaiah 9:6 “a child born”

This refers to King Hezekiah.

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2012/02/08/fifth-response-to-dalton-lifsey-isaiah-956-67/

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2012/02/07/thomas-on-isaiah-95-6/

178. Isaiah 9:6 “a son given – deity”

See # 177. No mention is made of the “deity” of the child.

179. Isaiah 9:6 “declared to be the son of God with power”

See #177. No mention is made of “son of God”

180. Isaiah 9:6 “the wonderful one, Peleh”

See #177.

181. Isaiah 9:6 “the counselor, Yaatz”

See #177.

182. Isaiah 9:6 “the mighty God, E-l Gibor”

See #177. The literal translation of Hezekiah’s name is “the might of God”. The point of this prophecy is that God’s might will be manifested in the times of Hezekiah.

183. Isaiah 9:6 “the everlasting Father, Avi Adth”

See #177. The point of this prophecy is that God’s sovereignty as Master of time will be manifested in Hezekiah’s time.

184. Isaiah 9:6 “the Prince of Peace, Sar Shalom”

See #177.

185. Isaiah 9:7 “to establish an everlasting kingdom”

This is talking of the throne of David to which the Christian Jesus has no claim (see #48).

186. Isaiah 9:7 “his character – just”

See #177.

187. Isaiah 9:7 “no end to his government, throne, peace”

The phrase translated here as “no end” is the same phrase used in Isaiah 2:7 where it is clear that the intent is a great abundance as opposed to literal eternity.

188. Isaiah 11:1 “called a Nazarene – the branch, Netzer”

No one is called a Nazarene in this passage. This passage refers to a scion from the house of David who will rule over a world at peace. Jesus was not from the house of David (see #48) and he did not rule over a world at peace. There is no way to claim that Jesus fulfilled this prophecy.

189. Isaiah 11:1 “a rod out of Jesse – son of Jesse”

See #188

190. Isaiah 11:2 “anointed one by the spirit”

See #188

191. Isaiah 11:2 “his character – wisdom, knowledge, et al”

See #188

192. Isaiah 11:3 “he would know their thoughts”

See #188

193. Isaiah 11:4 “judge in righteousness”

See #188.

194. Isaiah 11:4 “judges with the sword of his mouth”

See #188

195. Isaiah 11:5 “character: righteous & faithful”

See #188

196. Isaiah 11:10 “the gentiles seek him”

See #188

197. Isaiah 12:2 “called Yeshua – Yeshua”

No one is called “Yeshua” in this passage.

198. Isaiah 22:22 “the one given all authority to govern”

This is referring to Elyakim; a faithful servant of the house of David as the prophet explicitly declares (verse 20).

199. Isaiah 25:8 “the resurrection predicted”

This is referring to the comfort of Israel as the verse makes clear.

200. Isaiah 26:19 “the power of resurrection predicted”

This is referring to the resurrection of those faithful to God as the context makes clear; not the resurrection of one lone individual.

201. Isaiah 28:16 “the Messiah is the precious corner stone”

There is no reason to associate this prophecy with Jesus. The adjective “precious” is completely subjective.

202. Isaiah 28:16 “the sure foundation”

See #201

203. Isaiah 29:13 “he indicated hypocritical obedience to His word”

It is God speaking in this passage and it is not a prophetic prediction.

204. Isaiah 29:14 “the wise are confounded by the word”

The passage speaks of the wise being confounded but the passage does not say that they will be confounded through the word. In any case this passage is a rebuke to the Jews in Isaiah’s day and has nothing to do with Jesus.

205. Isaiah 32:2 “a refuge – a man shall be a hiding place”

This is talking about righteous Hezekiah. There is no reason to believe that Jesus fulfilled this prophecy.

206. Isaiah 35:4 “he will come and save you”

This is talking about God avenging the persecution of the Jewish people.

207. Isaiah 35:5-6 “to have a ministry of miracles”

The passage is talking about Israel’s redemption from exile (verse 10).

208. Isaiah 40:3,4 “preceded by a forerunner”

This is talking about the ultimate revelation of God’s glory (verse 5).

209. Isaiah 40:9 “behold your God”

This is talking about the God that Israel loved and hoped for throughout their exile not the god of their persecutors.

210. Isaiah 40:10 “he will come to reward”

See #209

211. Isaiah 40:11 “a shepherd – compassionate life-giver”

See #209

212. Isaiah 42:1-4 “the servant – as a faithful patient redeemer”

This passage is talking about the people of Israel and their King Messiah. There is nothing in this passage that Jesus can claim to have fulfilled.

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2012/07/24/armor-bearers-isaiah-5211/

213. Isaiah 42:2 “meek and lowly”

There is nothing more haughty then claiming to be divine.

214. Isaiah 42:3 “he brings hope for the hopeless”

See # 212

215. Isaiah 42:4 “the nations shall wait on his teachings”

See # 212

216. Isaiah 42:6 “the light (salvation) of the Gentiles”

See #212

217. Isaiah 42:1,6 “his is a worldwide compassion”

See #212

218. Isaiah 42:7 “bind eyes opened”

This refers to Israel’s redemption from exile (as per verse 16)

219. Isaiah 43:11 “he is the only savior”

This is talking about the God that Israel bears witness to; not the god that Israel bears witness against.

220. Isaiah 44:3 “he will send the spirit of God”

This is God’s promise to Israel.

221. Isaiah 45:21-25 “he is the lord and savior”

This is talking about God Himself.

222. Isaiah 45:23 “he will be the judge”

See #221

223. Isaiah 46:9,10 “declares things not yet done”

This is talking about God.

224. Isaiah 48:12 “the first and the last”

This is talking about God.

225. Isaiah 48:16,17 “he came as a teacher”

The prophet is speaking here in the name of God concerning Israel’s return from Babylon.

226. Isaiah 49:1 “”called from the womb – his humanity”

This is talking about Israel and the prophet Isaiah.

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2012/07/24/armor-bearers-isaiah-5211/

227. Isaiah 49:5 “a servant from the womb”

See # 226

228. Isaiah 49:6 “he will restore Israel”

See #226

229. Isaiah 49:6 “a salvation for Israel”

See #226

230. Isaiah 49:6 “he is the light of the Gentiles”

See #226. It is interesting to note that despite 2000 years of Jesus’ teaching it is still Isaiah’s words of hope for humanity that are written on the side of the UN building and it is still Isaiah’s metaphor of the wolf lying with the lamb that is most commonly used to describe the era of the real Messiah.

231. Isaiah 49:6 “he is a salvation to the ends of the earth”

See #226. The prophet’s role is to announce God’s salvation to the ends of the earth.

232. Isaiah 49:7 “he is despised of the nation”

See #226

233. Isaiah 50:3 “heaven is clothed in black at his humiliation”

The passage says nothing about anyone’s humiliation.

234. Isaiah 50:4 “he is a learned counselor for the weary”

This is referring to the prophet.

235. Isaiah 50:5 “the servant bound willingly to obedience”

See #234

236. Isaiah 50:6a “I gave my back to the smiters”

See #234

237. Isaiah 50:6b “he was smitten on the cheeks”

See #234. Incidentally; the passage speaks of the prophet’s beard being pulled at, not that he was smitten on the cheek.

238. Isaiah 50:6c “he was spat upon”

See #234

239. Isaiah 52:7 “published good tidings on the mountains”

This speaks of the messenger bringing Israel the good tidings of her redemption from exile.

240. Isaiah 52:13 “the servant exalted”

This speaks of Israel’s exaltation at the time of her redemption from exile.

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/isaiah-53/

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/isaiah-53/

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2011/03/11/isaiah-53-teaches-that-jesus-is-not-the-messiah/

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2011/11/02/some-thoughts-on-isaiah-53-by-thomas/

241. Isaiah 52:14 “the servant shockingly abused”

See #240

242. Isaiah 52:15 “nations startled by the message of the servant”

See #240

243. Isaiah 52:15 “his blood shed sprinkles nations”

See #240. The passage says nothing about the servant’s blood shed; in fact the passage does not mention blood altogether.

244. Isaiah 53:1 “his people would not believe him”

See #240. The passage does not say that “his people” would not believe him. The passage speaks of the kings of nation having a difficult time believing the report of the exaltation of Israel (see Micah 7:10,16).

245. Isaiah 53:2 “appearance of an ordinary man”

See #240. The appearance of the servant is NOT that of an ordinary man. Those who see him consider him subhuman.

246. Isaiah 53:3a “despised”

See #240

247. Isaiah 53:3b “rejected”

See #240

248. Isaiah 53:3c “great sorrow and grief”

See #240

249. Isaiah 53:3d “men hide from being associated with him”

See #240

250. Isaiah 53:4a “he would have a healing ministry”

See #240. No word is mentioned about a ministry.

251. Isaiah 53:4b “thought to be cursed by God”

See #240

252. Isaiah 53:5a “bears penalty for mankind’s iniquities”

See #240

253. Isaiah 53:5b “his sacrifice provides peace between man and God”

See #240. No mention is made of a sacrifice and no mention is made of peace between man and God. The prophet speaks of peace in a general sense without specifying between which two parties the peace is maintained.

254. Isaiah 53:5c “his sacrifice would heal man of sin”

See #240. In any case; the prophet does not speak of “healing man from sin”. Healing is mentioned in a general sense.

255. Isaiah 53:6a “he would be the sin-bearer for all mankind”

See #240

256. Isaiah 53:6b “God’s will that he bear sin for all mankind”

See #240

257. Isaiah 53:7a “oppressed and afflicted”

See #240

258. Isaiah 53:7b “silent before his accusers”

See #240

259. Isaiah 53:7c “”sacrificial lamb”

See #240. No mention is made of a “sacrifice”.

260. Isaiah 53:8a “confined and persecuted”

See #240

261. Isaiah 53:8b “he would be judged”

See #240

262. Isaiah 53:8c “killed”

See #240

263. Isaiah 53:8d “dies for the sins of the world”

See #240

264. Isaiah 53:9a “buried in a rich man’s grave”

See #240. Actually the prophet says that the servant is put to death with the rich.

265. Isaiah 53:9b “innocent and had done no violence”

See #240. The prophet says that the servant is innocent from the violence that he was accused of; not that he had never done violence.

266. Isaiah 53:9c “no deceit in his mouth”

See #240. The prophet does not say that the servant never had deceit in his mouth; rather the prophet says that the servant is not being punished for deception that he actually committed.

267. Isaiah 53:10a “God’s will that he die for mankind”

See #240. The passage simply says that it was God’s will to crush the servant with sickness. The passage does not say why God chose to bring this affliction upon the servant.

268. Isaiah 53:10b “an offering for sin”

See #240. The verse says nothing about an offering for sin. The passage speaks of the servant acknowledging his own guilt.

269. Isaiah 53:10c “resurrected and live forever”

See #240. The passage says nothing about a resurrection and nothing about living forever.

270. Isaiah 53:10d “he would prosper”

See #240. The passage actually says that the servant will see physical progeny; something that Jesus never merited to see.

271. Isaiah 53:11a “God fully satisfied with his suffering”

See #240. The prophet says nothing about God’s satisfaction. The verse speaks of the servant enjoying the fruit of his labor.

272. Isaiah 53:11b “the servant will justify man”

See #240.

273. Isaiah 53:11c “the sin bearer for all mankind”

See #240

274. Isaiah 53:12a “exalted by God because of his sacrifice”

See #240. Note the servant is exalted because of his sacrifice not because of his alleged divine nature.

275. Isaiah 53:12b “he would give up his life to save mankind”

See #240. The passage does not say why the servant gives up his life.

276. Isaiah 53:12c “numbered with the transgressors”

See #240

277. Isaiah 53:12d “sin bearer for all mankind”

See #240

278. Isaiah 53:12e intercede to God on behalf of mankind”

See #240

279. Isaiah 55:3 “resurrected by God”

This passage says nothing about a resurrection. It is talking to a plural group not to a lone individual.

280. Isaiah 55:4a “a witness”

This is talking about David and his righteous descendant – see #48.

281. Isaiah 55:4b “he is a leader and a commander”

See #280

282. Isaiah 55:5 “God would glorify him”

This is talking about Israel.

283. Isaiah 59:16a “intercessor between man and God”

The verse actually says that there is no intercessor.

284. Isaiah 59:16b “he would come to provide salvation”

This is talking about God saving Israel and avenging them from their persecutors.

285. Isaiah 59:20 “he would come to Zion as their redeemer”

This is talking about the real Messiah. There is no way that one can claim that Jesus fulfilled this prophecy.

286. Isaiah 60:1-3 “he would show light to the gentiles”

This is talking about Israel clearly and explicitly.

287. Isaiah 61:1a “the spirit of God upon him”

The prophet.

288. Isaiah 61:1b “the Messiah will preach the good news”

See #287

289. Isaiah 61:1c “provide freedom from the bondage of sin”

See #287. The prophet announces freedom to the captives of exile; no mention is made of sin.

290. Isaiah 61:1-2a “proclaim a period of grace”

See #287

291. Jeremiah 23:5-6 “descendant of David”

See #48

292. Jeremiah 23:5-6 “the Messiah will be both God and man”

See #48. The passage declares that the Messiah will be called by the name: “the Lord is our righteousness” just as the city of Jerusalem is called by the exact same name (Jeremiah 33:16).

293. Jeremiah 31:22 “born of a virgin”

The verse says nothing about anyone being born of a virgin.

294. Jeremiah 31:31 “the Messiah will be the new covenant”

The passage says nothing about the Messiah being the new covenant.

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2011/03/27/jeremiah-31-teaches-that-christianity-is-not-the-new-covenant/

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2011/11/09/some-thoughtso-n-jeremiah-31-by-thomas/

295. Jeremiah 33:14-15 “descendant of David”

See #48

296. Ezekiel 34:23-24 “descendant of David”

See #48

297. Ezekiel 37:24-25 “descendant of David”

See #48

298. Daniel 2:44-45 “the stone that shall break the kingdoms”

This is talking about Israel’s rule in the Messianic era.

299. Daniel 7:13-14a “he shall ascend into heaven”

This vision is interpreted by the angel himself as a reference to Israel (verses 18, 27).

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2010/11/23/daniel-713/

300. Daniel 7:13-14b “highly exalted”

See #299

301. Daniel 7:13-14c “his dominion would be everlasting”

See #299

302. Daniel 9:24a “to make an end to sin”

This is referring to Israel’s suffering in exile.

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/daniel-924-27/

303. Daniel 9:24a “to make reconciliation for iniquity”

See #302

304. Daniel 9:24b “he would be holy”

This is talking of the Temple.

305. Daniel 9:25 “483 years to the exact day”

The prophet speaks of two separate periods; one of 49 years and one of 434 years. The calculations made by the missionaries have no basis in reality outside of the missionary desire to shoehorn Jesus into the time frame of this prophecy.

306. Daniel 9:26a “cut off”

This is referring to the last high priest that served in the Second Temple.

307. Daniel 9:26b “die for the sins of the world”

The prophet gives no reason for the purpose of the “cutting off”.

308. Daniel 9:26c “killed before the destruction of the Temple”

The prophet actually says that this “cutting off” will be concurrent with the destruction of the temple; not “before”.

309. Daniel 10:5-6 “Messiah in a glorified state”

This is talking of the angel Gabriel that Daniel sees in a vision.

310. Hosea 11:1 “he would be called out of Egypt”

This is not a prophetic prediction; this refers to Israel’s redemption from Egypt in the time of the exodus.

311. Hosea 13:14 “he would defeat death”

This is part of God’s rebuke to the Northern kingdom. The prophet is explaining how God would have redeemed them from death itself had they obeyed him. Paul’s quote from this passage in 1Corinthians 15:55-57 is a mistranslation as well as a wrenching of the verse out of context.

312. Joel 2:32 “offer salvation to all mankind”

This is talking about God’s salvation in the end of time.

313. Jonah 1:17 “death and resurrection of christ”

This is not a prophetic prediction it is a narrative describing what happened to Jonah.

314. Micah 5:2a “born in Bethlehem”

This passage does not mention the birthplace of the Messiah; it mentions the clan to which he belongs – see #48.

315. Micah 5:2b “ruler in Israel”

This is talking about the true Messiah who will actually rule in a practical sense.

316. Micah 5:2c “from everlasting”

This means that God’s plan to bring the Messiah goes back to the beginning of time.

317. Haggai 2:6-9 “he would visit the Second Temple”

This is talking about the honor that will be given to God in the setting of the Second Temple.

318. Haggai 2:23 “descendant of Zerubbabel”

This is referring to Zerubavel himself; not his descendant. In any case one who denies having a human father cannot claim lineage from Zerubavel (see #48).

319. Zechariah 3:8 “God’s servant”

This is talking about Zerubavel not to a person who saw himself as equal to God.

320. Zechariah 6:12-13 “priest and king”

This prophecy refers to two separate people; the high priest and Zerubavel. This person (Zerubavel) is described as one who builds the Temple an activity never attributed to Jesus.

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/zechariah-69-15/

321. Zechariah 9:9a “greeted with rejoicing in Jerusalem”

This is talking about a king who will rule in a time when war is no more.

322. Zechariah 9:9b “beheld as a king”

This is a king not merely someone who is “beheld” as a king. See #321

323. Zechariah 9:9c “the Messiah would be just”

See #321 and #69

324. Zechariah 9:9d “the Messiah will bring salvation”

See #321

325. Zechariah 9:9e “the Messiah would be humble”

See #321 and #213

326. Zechariah 9:9f “presented to Jerusalem riding on a donkey”

See #321

327. Zechariah 10:4 “the cornerstone”

This passage is talking about the victory that God will grant the children of Judah and Ephraim in battle (verse 5).

328. Zechariah 11:4-6a “at his coming, Israel to have unfit leaders”

This passage says nothing about the coming of the Messiah.

329. Zechariah 11:4-6b “rejection causes God to remove His protection”

The passage does not say why it is that God is removing His protection.

330. Zechariah 11:4-6c “rejected in favor of another king”

There is no rejection spoken of in these verses. Verse 8 speaks of a spurning of God Himself.

331. Zechariah 11:7 “ministry to the “poor”, the believing remnant”

This is talking about God shepherding those loyal to Him.

332. Zechariah 11:8a “unbelief forces Messiah to reject them”

This is talking about Israel’s spurning of God thus bringing upon themselves God’s punishment.

333. Zechariah 11:8b “despised”

See #332

334. Zechariah 11:9 “stops ministering those who rejected him”

See #332

335. Zechariah 11:10-11a “rejection causes God to remove protection”

See #332

336. Zechariah 11:10-11b “the Messiah would be God”

No mention is made of Messiah.

337. Zechariah 11:12-13a “betrayed for 30 pieces of silver”

No one is “betrayed” in this passage. The thirty pieces of silver are the pay of the shepherd.

338. Zechariah 11:12-13b “rejected”

No one is rejected in these verses.

339. Zechariah 11:12-13c “thirty pieces of silver cast into the house of the Lord”

Not a prophetic prediction. The symbolic pay of the shepherd is thrown into the house of the Lord.

340. Zechariah 11:12-13d “the Messiah would be God”

No mention is made of Messiah.

341. Zechariah 12:10a “the Messiah’s body will be pierced”

This stabbing takes place in the context of a battle which pits all the nations of the world against Jerusalem (verse 9).

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/zechariah-1210/

342. Zechariah 12:10b “the Messiah will be both God and man”

No mention is made of Messiah.

343. Zechariah 12:10c “the Messiah would be rejected”

No mention is made of anyone being rejected.

344. Zechariah 13:7a “God’s will he die for mankind”

It is the enemies of God who are being killed here and no reason is given for their death.

345. Zechariah 13:7b “a violent death”

See #344

346. Zechariah 13:7c “both God and man”

No one in this verse is both God and man. The passage refers to God’s enemies as “the man who sees himself as my competitor”.

347. Zechariah 13:7d “Israel scattered as a result of rejecting him”

This is talking of the scattering of the enemies of God; not of Israel. And again; no one is rejected in this passage.

348. Zechariah 14:4 “he would return to the Mt. of Olives”

This passage says that God’s presence will be manifest on the Mount of Olives; not that He will “return”.

349. Malachi 3:1a “messenger to prepare the way for Messiah”

The messenger prepares the way for God’s presence to be manifest in the Temple.

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/malachi-31-4/

350. Malachi 3:1b “sudden appearance at the Temple”

This is talking about God’s manifestation in the Temple.

351. Malachi 3:1c “messenger of the new covenant”

See #349.

352. Malachi 4:5 “forerunner in spirit of Elijah”

This passage tells us that the forerunner will be Elijah himself; not someone who never claimed to be Elijah.

353. Malachi 4:6 “Forerunner will turn many to righteousness”

See #352.

As we have seen; the vast majority of these “prophecies” are not prophetic predictions at all. Some of them are simply fanciful translations and interpretations that have no basis outside of the missionary imagination. Many of them clearly cannot apply to Jesus for simple grammatical and contextual reasons. Others cannot apply to Jesus as he is portrayed in Christian theology (i.e. sinless, without human father). Some of these prophecies were clearly not fulfilled by Jesus (such as those which speak of an age of universal peace).

It is not that there is a dearth of prophetic material that can help us identify the Messiah and the Messianic age.

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2010/12/21/letter-to-sy-about-messiah/

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2010/09/05/the-polar-opposite/

The problem seems to be when the approach to Scripture is dictated by the desire to “find” someone hiding between the lines. Instead of asking: “Of whom speaketh the prophet”, try reading Scripture with the question: “what is the prophet trying to tell me”.

You may find this list of passages helpful.

http://yourphariseefriend.wordpress.com/2010/08/31/1000-verses/

Source: http://prooftexts.wordpress.com/

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The Ten Commandments – A Song for Kids

by G-dcast – Meaningful Jewish Screentime

A rockin trip through the Ten Commandments. We bring the decalogue to life with some villagers and their mischievous ways, and your kids will never forget the catchy lyrics. A great way to learn the commandments! Created in honor of Shavuot, the holiday when the Jewish people commemorate receiving the Torah (Law) at Mount Sinai.

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